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FAQs A Primer for the People of
Christ Church Anglican
   
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What is the Anglican Communion?
The Anglican Communion is a worldwide network of 38 autonomous geographic areas called "provinces" that were spawned by the Church of England as the British Empire colonized the world.
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How is the Anglican Communion organized?
The Anglican Communion is organized around conciliatory bodies; that is, it is based on councils at every level provincial, diocesan, and even in the parishes.
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Who leads each of the 38 Anglican Provinces?
The leader of each province is called an Archbishop or Primate.  The Primate of the Province of Uganda, of which Christ Church Anglican is now a part, is The Most Rev. Henry Luke Orombi.
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Are the Anglican Primates bishops of dioceses as well?
Almost all the Provincial Archbishops serve also as diocesan bishops.  For example, Henry Orombi, Archbishop of the Church of Uganda, serves also as Bishop of the Diocese of Kampala.  The only exception is Frank Griswold, Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church USA who is not a diocesan bishop.
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Who is the Archbishop of Canterbury?
The present Archbishop of Canterbury is The Most Rev. Rowan Williams.
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Is the Archbishop of Canterbury like the Pope in the Roman Catholic Church?
No.  The Archbishop of Canterbury is more like a "first among equals" or senior Primate.  Because of his position, however, he is extremely influential.
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What are the Anglican "Instruments of Unity?"
The Archbishop of Canterbury, along with the Anglican Consultative Council, the Primates Meeting and the Lambeth Conference, are considered the four "Instruments of Unity" within the Anglican Communion.  It is important to note that all four of the Instruments of Unity warned the Episcopal Church in the United States (ECUSA) not to do what it did; that is, consecrate an openly gay bishop.
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Having separated from the Episcopal Church USA, are we automatically Anglicans now?
If you have been an Episcopalian, you have been also an Anglican.  The Episcopal Church USA has been a part of the Anglican Communion since its very beginning.
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How did Christ Church end up in the Diocese of Kampala?
Upon reaching the agreement to separate from ECUSA and the Diocese of Kansas, Archbishop Henry Orombi, a long-time friend of Christ Church, agreed to provide episcopal (or bishop's) oversight to the parish; that is, he agreed to be our bishop.  In that way Christ Church was able to remain in the worldwide Anglican Communion
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During the home groups in which the separation agreement was discussed, some received the impression that Christ Church would not be under Archbishop Henry's authority.  What happened?
The issue of episcopal (bishop's) oversight within the Anglican Communion is quite complex, extremely political, very sensitive, and with many influential persons involved.  (For further information, you may wish to visit some of the web sites referenced above, searching for Alternative Episcopal Oversight (AEO),  Panel of Reference and/or Dromantine Primates' meeting.)  As late as March 2005, Archbishop Henry was still seeking council among his counter-parts in other Anglican provinces and others, and praying for discernment about providing oversight for Christ Church, Overland Park.  It was not until receipt of the Arch-bishop's letter dated 22 April 2005 weeks after the home groups and the vote that we received formal notice of Archbishop Henry's accepting Christ Church into the Diocese of Kampala (Uganda.)
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What does it mean to be a Ugandan Anglican?
The core beliefs of the Church of Uganda and Christ Church Anglican are totally congruent belief in the authority of Holy Scripture; belief that Jesus is the (not a) way, the truth and the life; belief in the sanctity of marriage between a man and a woman in a lifelong relationship, commitment to Great Commission ministry, etc.  That we are under the episcopal authority of a bishop half a world away is really no problem, given the communications and travel capabilities of the 21st Century.
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What has or will change at Christ Church Anglican?
 Not much has changed since our transfer to the diocese of Kampala.  Our core purpose and values, our mission statement, our commitment to discipleship, our teaching and our worship services remain the same as before the separation.
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Will we financially support the Diocese of Kampala?
Yes, along with the other parishes in the diocese, we will send a part of out tithes and offerings to support the work of our diocese.

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How will Archbishop Henry oversee the running of Christ Church?
Archbishop Henry has expressed great confidence in the leadership at Christ Church Anglican and expects the church to continue to be led by the Senior Pastor and the Parish Council.
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Will someone else be able to take over our property?
Archbishop Henry has made it quite clear that he has no interest in ownership of Christ Church Anglican property.  Nor will a new Anglican jurisdiction, when it emerges, have any rights to our property.
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What happens to our relationship with Bishop Wolfe and the Diocese of Kansas?
We are no longer under Bishop Wolfe's Episcopal Authority, nor do we have any formal relationship with the Diocese of Kansas.
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Can Bishop Wolfe's inhibit and/or depose certain Christ Church clergy?
 Though Bishop Wolfe sent letters of inhibition to Ron and D.O., the letters had no consequence inasmuch as they were no longer under his jurisdiction.  By the time Bishop Wolfe's letters were written, both Ron and D.O. had become "canonically resident" in other dioceses.
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How many other churches have left or will leave the Episcopal Church, USA.
 It is hard to get an exact number, but it is estimated that around 100 parishes have left ECUSA and sought Episcopal oversight elsewhere.  Some have affiliated with the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA), others with dioceses in Canada, South America and Africa.  A significant number of orthodox clergy have left ECUSA as well to affiliate with the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Churches or overseas Anglican dioceses.  It is anticipated that many more clergy, parishes and even dioceses will leave ECUSA should it, by its actions at its 2006 General Convention, opt to walk apart from the rest of the Anglican Communion.
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Have others who have left been able to negotiate separation agreements as favorable as Christ Church's?
Unfortunately, not.  Many congregations have simply walked away from their buildings, contents, and bank accounts.  A number of lawsuits involving property ownership are still in the courts.  In one instance when the rector was on a sabbatical leave, the diocesan bishop arrived at a parish together with a 12-member swat team', seized the bank accounts, hacked the computer system, prevented vestry members from entering the church and replaced the rector with a liberal priest.
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What is the Anglican Communion Network?
The ACN is a network of parishes and dioceses.  The formation of the Network was originally suggested by the Archbishop of Canterbury, The Most Rev. Rowan Williams. Initial plans for the Convocation were laid at a gathering of mainstream Anglican leaders (including four Primates) in London in November, 2003. A Memorandum of Agreement came out of this meeting and was ultimately signed by 13 Episcopal Church USA (ECUSA) bishops. The Memorandum stated the intention of these bishops to begin taking steps toward organizing a network of "confessing" dioceses and congregations within ECUSA.  Since that initial signing, a total of 10 Episcopal dioceses, Albany, Central Florida, Fort Worth, Pittsburgh, Quincy, Rio Grande, San Joaquin, South Carolina, Springfield and Dallas, have ratified their affiliation.

 

The Network of Anglican Communion Dioceses and Parishes was officially launched January 20, 2004 at the Network's Organizing Convocation held at Christ Church, Plano, Texas.  The Convocation included representatives from 12 Episcopal dioceses as well as individuals from 5 geographic regions and one non-geographic area that were designated as "Convocations".  The gathering unanimously adopted a Structural charter and affirmed Theological Charter.  The Rt. Rev. Robert Duncan was elected Moderator of the new Network and will serve for a three-year term. 

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How is Christ Church Anglican involved with the ACN?
D.O. serves as Dean of the ACN Mid-Continental Convocation, a 20-state area in the heartland.  In this capacity, he communicates with clergy and congregations who choose to stand for the same principles, church teachings and doctrine as does the Network (and, for that matter, Christ Church Anglican.)  Sally Cline assists D.O. in the day to day ACN operational activities.
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What will happen to the ACN long term?
It appears likely that, in time, the ACN will evolve or morph into the orthodox Anglican jurisdiction in the United  States, replacing ECUSA as the recognized province of the Anglican Communion.  Just exactly how the organization of clergy and congregations may look would be strictly a matter of conjecture at this time.
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How can the ACN help Christ Church?
Being an ACN member affords Christ Church the opportunity to be in dialogue with  mainstream Anglicans, both here and abroad, and to be on the cutting edge of developments in the worldwide Anglican Communion.  Consistent with our core value of being "blessed to be a blessing", we serve as a beacon of hope to others who seek to stand in the faith once delivered to the saints.
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Where can I learn more about these subjects?
Go to this website and choose from the links on the left side of the home page.

 

                                                                                    www.acn-midcon.org